There is no information on the Mutual Aid Cash website indicating who owns or runs the business.

The company domain (‘mutualaidcash.com’) was registered on the 24th August 2012 and lists a ‘Gary S. Webber’ from Houston, Texas as the owner.

The provided company address however points to what appears to be virtual office space with Google listing multiple businesses at the address.

The private server Mutual Aid Cash is hosted on has one other website on it, a shopping mall called Belttal (‘belttal.com’) – who seem to have no qualms about ┬áripping off Google’s logo.

The domain WHOIS information for Belttal lists a ‘Luo Yong’ who appears to be based in Shenzhen, China.

Putting two and two together, if I had to guess I’d say Mutual Aid Cash’s Gary S. Webber doesn’t exist and Luo in China would be the admin behind the scheme.

The Mutual Aid Cash Product Line

Mutual Aid Cash has no retailable products or services with members of the company are only able to market membership to the company itself.

The Mutual Aid Cash Compensation Plan

Mutual Aid Cash pay out their members using a 5×7 matrix commissions structure.

A 5×7 matrix places an affiliate at the top of the matrix with five legs branching out under them (level 1). In turn, these five legs branch out into another five legs (level 2) and so on and so forth down 7 levels.

For each member a Mutual Aid Cash affiliate has in their matrix, the company pays out a commission. How much of a commission paid out depends on what level a new member is placed on an affiliate’s matrix:

  • Level 1 – $10
  • Levels 2 to 5 – $5
  • Level 6 – $8
  • Level 7 – $15

Note that these payments are once off and are not paid monthly.

Joining Mutual Aid Cash

Membership to Mutual Aid Cash is a one time fee of $55.

Conclusion

With no product being sold other than company membership and 100% of commissions being paid out to affiliates coming from membership fees, Mutual Aid Cash fits the definition of a pyramid scheme.

Members join the company for $55 and earn commissions when other new members join the company after them (recruited either directly or by their upline or downlines).

If recruitment stops so do the commissions and the scheme collapses, leaving those at the bottom $55 in the hole.