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Described on their website as ‘one of the greatest home businesses in the world‘, MX Fast Money was launched a few weeks ago and is headed up by James Lee Valentine.

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Valentine (photo right) operates his various companies out of the British Virgin Islands, a known tax haven.

Another of Valentine’s companies, MillionaireX1, was launched in 2009 and pays affiliates commissions based using a matrix compensation structure. MillionaireX Affiliates recruit new affiliates and cycle out of a series of matrices, with MillionaireX paying them a commission for doing so.

With MillionaireX resembling a pyramid scheme and relying on a constant influx of new recruits to keep its matrices cycling, Valentine (photo right) appears to be launching new programs in an attempt to attract new recruits.

Back in November 2012 Valentine launched Supreme Wealth Alliance, which cost $55 to buy a matrix position and earn on the recruitment of others.

Five months later things appear to have stalled over at Supreme Wealth Alliance and so Valentine is back with a new scheme, MX Fast Money. Read on for a full review.

The MX Fast Money Product Line

MX Fast Money has no retailable products or services. Instead, affiliates join the company buy buying a position in the matrix based compensation plan.

Bundled with each matrix position is access to founder James Lee Valentines video training series, “Pure Power”.

Here’s a taste:

The MX Fast Money Compensation Plan

The MX Fast Money compensation plan revolves around affiliates purchasing positions in the company’s compensation plan for $40 and being paid a commission when these positions cycle.

MX Fast Money use a 2×2 matrix compensation structure. A 2×2 matrix places an affiliate at the top of the structure with two positions directly under them (level 1).

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In turn, these two positions also have two positions under them (level 2), with the idea being to fill the matrix positions in order to cycle out.

Upon all matrix positions being filled (either by direct recruitment or the recruiting efforts of others), the affiliate at the top of the matrix is paid $100.

Upon cycling, MX Fast Money affiliates are also placed into a new 2×2 matrix, with the initial cycle process then repeating itself.

Joining MX Fast Money

Affiliate membership to MX Fast Money is $40.

Conclusion

With the reliance of new affiliates to fill matrix positions so that existing members can cycle, MX Fast Money is obviously firmly rooted in pyramid scheme territory.

Multiple mentions of Valentine’s main scheme, MillionaireX, appear on the MX Fast Money site, mostly encouraging MX Fast Money members to ‘to pay for an optional entry into the more lucrative MillionaireX1 (MX1) business where every cycle pays out $700 commission‘.

Notably MX Fast Money is priced $10 cheaper than Supreme Wealth Alliance so this appears to be an attempt by Valentine to start another feeder into MillionaireX at a lower price point.

With both MillionaireX and Supreme Wealth Alliance both suffering from the sustainability problem of constantly relying on new recruits to join and MX Fast Money sharing that fundamental flaw, things are probably not going to be all that different this time around.

The lure of $100 might entice some affiliates to go on and join MillionaireX however sooner or later the recruiting will die down at which point Valentine and the MillionaireX scheme will be back at square 1 – stalled matrices and the need to get new recruits to join the scheme.